2010 wasn’t a very good year for me, and one of the reasons is that not only I didn’t have enough time to read what I want but also had to invest most of the little time available in not-so-interesting material due to some project or team need.

Let me try to compile here a list with the books I’ve read this year that I think could be interesting to this blog’s audience. Given the number of books I’ll also add a very quick review. Next year I’ll try to write a more complete review as I finish each book.

## Cloud Application Architectures: Building Applications and Infrastructure in the Cloud ### tl;dr: Do not waste your time. I was expecting it to be some pioneer work on patterns and architectures to the cloud but it’s basically an outdated manual to AWS.

<iframe src=”http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?lt1=_blank&bc1=000000&IS2=1&bg1=FFFFFF&fc1=000000&lc1=0000FF&t=fragmental-20&o=1&p=8&l=as1&m=amazon&f=ifr&md=10FE9736YVPPT7A0FBG2&asins=0937073806” style=”width:120px;height:240px;” scrolling=”no” marginwidth=”0”marginheight=”0” frameborder=”0”></iframe> ## Literate Programming ### tl;dr: You don’t have to read this but it will make you a better programmer. When it comes to expressive design, this is a classic.

## Coders at Work ### tl;dr: Must read. You’ll find out that these “crazy new techniques” that we use today are all part of the standard toolset of the best hackers since decades ago.

## Growing Object-Oriented Software, Guided by Tests ### tl;dr: Must read. This book has the kind of knowledge one only acquires by working with experienced developers.

## REST in Practice ### tl;dr: Must read for developers interested in systems integration and architecture in general. Nothing new if you already know how to use REST with hypermedia.

## The Design of Design: Essays from a Computer Scientist ### tl;dr: Must read. Great discussion on good design and how people should be educated to become great designers.

## Beautiful Data: The Stories Behind Elegant Data Solutions ### tl;dr: Meh. A random collection of articles on random projects that used data somehow.

<iframe src=”http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?lt1=_blank&bc1=000000&IS2=1&bg1=FFFFFF&fc1=000000&lc1=0000FF&t=fragmental-20&o=1&p=8&l=as1&m=amazon&f=ifr&md=10FE9736YVPPT7A0FBG2&asins=0321525655”style=”width:120px;height:240px;” scrolling=”no” marginwidth=”0” marginheight=”0” frameborder=”0”></iframe> ## Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery ### tl;dr: Good source of tips and tricks; don’t expect much more.

## Confessions of a Public Speaker ### tl;dr: Yet another good source of tips and tricks; don’t expect much more.

## Managing the Design Factory ### tl;dr: Very good reading for anyone that has to manage a team delivering software. We’re not alone, the problems we have are also present in same other industries have.

## The Toyota Way Fieldbook ### tl;dr: If you want to learn just enough about Lean to apply in software development this book could replace The Toyota Way.

## Thinking in Systems: A Primer ### tl;dr: A good basic introduction to the topic. One billion examples of feedback loops, but that’s it.

## Leading Lean Software Development: Results Are not the Point ### tl;dr: If you’ve read the other books in this series can probably skip this. It’s pretty much the same content but this one focuses on preaching to more senior management.

## Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers ### tl;dr: If you have trouble describing business models or if you are interested in finding out a new tool this is a must read. Too much hype around it, though, be careful.

## Information Dashboard Design: The Effective Visual Communication of Data ### tl;dr: Good source of examples for dashboards but doesn’t go any deeper than that. If you are currently working or will work soon with dashboards this can give you some ideas.

## The Back of the Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures ### tl;dr: If you use visual thinking there’s nothing new here; if you don’t this is a good primer.

## Attacking Faulty Reasoning: A Practical Guide to Fallacy-Free Arguments ### tl;dr: Interesting read. It probably helps you avoiding fallacies yourself but the toolset is a bit too heavy to use in arguments.

## How to Measure Anything: Finding the Value of Intangibles in Business ### tl;dr: A bit obvious but still useful. Be careful, though, the author’s mindset can lead to people and companies obsessed with measuring, even if measuring the wrong thing.